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Jessica Gutsue

-Bachelor’s degree in dietetics from Michigan State University,
-Master’s degree in dietetic education from Western Michigan University
-Member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Association since 2008
-Nutrtionist at Restorative Health Care

About Me

 

Is “Keto” Right for You?

“Keto”. It’s sort of a thing as of late. If you haven’t been living under a rock in the past 18 or so months, you’ve at least heard the term, if not fully adopted the diet yourself. Popularized by several credentialed and maybe not-so credentialed folks; the ketogenic diet was first studied and proven effective in 1921 as a therapy for children with seizure disorders.

Although there are variations of the ketogenic diet, generally it provides 70-90% fat, 10-15% protein and about 5% carbohydrate. Severely restricting carbohydrates, while consuming LOTS of healthy fat encourages the body to produce ketones and use them as fuel. Which results in a state called nutritional ketosis, an ability we’re all born with. To provide some context, the standard American diet is roughly 55% carbohydrates, 30% fat and 15% protein. This is a radical shift in macronutrient distribution. With that said, our bodies are amazing machines and can utilize both ketones (from fats), or glucose (primarily from carbohydrates and excess calories) as fuel. Thus the ability to survive on either plan.

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and with good reason, let’s talk about some of these. Though it’s initial research and use was to control epilepsy; more research is proving beneficial for several other conditions. This list includes dementia, migraines, depression and obesity, among others.

Since one in three adults are overweight or obese, weight loss is the main driver of the diets’ recent rise in popularity. The diet works in a few different ways, but regarding weight loss it’s largely due to the lack of insulin produced by the pancreas, and the body’s ability to burn fat as fuel. Since insulin remains low, the diet mimics a fasting state, burning fat, while providing most of one’s essential nutrients.

Let me explain how insulin is so key in the weight loss equation...

Heart Health Month

February is the time to start thinking about your heart! Just small changes to your everyday eating habits can help make your heart healthier and happiers.

First check out this great shopping list for heart healthy foods!

Then check out these great substitutions for more heart healthy recipes

Be sure to check out this article as well for heart T.L.C. tips 

Healthier Graduation Party Tips

How many graduation parties are you invited to this year? I count four, including the one I am giving for my daughter-my baby-I still can’t believe it. Graduation parties typically don’t have the healthiest food choices and the calories can add up quickly, but you can make better choices.

  • Eat something prior to the party to control appetite
  • Limit alcoholic beverages-choose water or carbonated water w/ fruit or diet soda instead
  • Fill half your plate with fruit and vegetables
  • Eat slowly
  • Use the small plate and only choose the foods you absolutely love and leave the rest

Of course, if you are giving the party, you can serve healthier choices! My daughter, who is vegan, has requested only vegan foods be served. I have found some tasty recipes like vegan lentil meatballs for meatball subs in whole grain buns and marinated grilled carrots to serve in whole grain hot dog buns instead of hot dogs!

Happy, healthy partying!

Foods That Might Help Lower Blood Pressure

Foods That Might Help Lower Blood Pressure

The topic of high blood pressure seems to be surrounding me a lot lately from dealing with my dad’s uncontrolled blood pressure, who has already experienced a stroke, a discussion with a patient this week wondering if there are foods to help lower blood pressure and preventing my own blood pressure troubles as my age is increasing (as I watch my age number increase so does the blood pressure number!).   Uncontrolled high blood pressure can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. It is important to get control of it sooner than later. We know a healthy lifestyle, such as eating healthy foods; regular exercise and stress management all play a role in preventing and controlling high blood pressure.

A lower sodium diet is helpful, especially limiting to avoiding processed foods and restaurant foods and if you do choose a processed food use 140mg of sodium per serving or less as a guide for low sodium choices.   Foods rich in calcium, potassium, magnesium, soy protein and omega-3 fatty acid could also improve blood pressure numbers. Here are some recommended foods rich in the nutrients mentioned:

Calcium: Almonds, greens, milk, calcium-fortified plant milk, fat-free yogurt,

Potassium: Swiss chard, yellowfin tuna, acorn squash, sweet potatoes, edamame, cooked spinach, bananas, fat-free yogurt, OJ, dried apricots, baked potatoes with skin, beans, cantaloupes, low-sodium V8 juice

Magnesium: Brown rice, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, flaxseeds, Brazil nuts, cashews, dark chocolate, spinach, Swiss chard, lentils, whole grain bread

Soy protein: Edamame, soy milk, tofu, unsalted soy nuts, calcium-fortifed tofu

Omega-3s: Fatty fish (salmon, tuna, halibut, mackerel), walnuts, soybeans, flaxseeds, chia seeds

Eating healthy and regular exercise is key, but so is controlling stress. Find time to meditate, just 10 minutes daily and quiet the mind, practice yoga, listen to soothing music etc.

Fad Free Simple Tips for a Healthier Lifestyle!

Fad Free Simple Tips for a Healthier Lifestyle!

Follow the attached tips to be healthier for life and not just a few weeks or as long as the next popular fad diet lasts!