Tricky traps of sneaky snacks

We all know that nutrition is a big part of our overall health. While nutrition labels were invented to inform consumers, marketing manager managers have managed to sneak a few things under the radar. Reading the nutrition label with an informed eye is the best step to beating them, so here are a few tricks to watch for.

Serving Size
The top of the label describes a standard serving size and how many servings a package contains. However, there are certain items that we look at and make serving size assumptions, so we fail to check the serving size. Sometimes it can be surprising: A bottle of pop may only have 75 calories per serving. But if that bottle contains two and a half servings and you drink the whole thing, you're consuming 225 calories.

Everyone’s Different
The footnote of the nutrition label gives suggestions on important nutrients such as fat, cholesterol and fiber, but these suggestions are based on a 2,000-2,500-calorie diet, and only a percentage of people have those recommended calorie amounts. For moderate active women especially, this may be too high. For very active men, this may be too low. Be sure to check your own BMR at the Nutrition section.

Sugar, sugar
We are in a sugar era, with people eating far more than any time in history, and this high sugar has been linked to the current obesity crisis. But added sugar comes in many forms, which so hard to find on the ingredients label. One study suggests manufacturers add sugar to 74% of packaged foods sold in supermarkets. The FDA requires food producers to list all ingredients in their foods. Here are just a few names of sugar to watch for in the ingredient list: Agave, barley malt, beet sugar, cane juice, caramel, confectioner's sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dehydrated cane juice, demerara, dextrin, dextrose, fructose, glucose, HFCS (high-fructose corn syrup), honey, maltodextrin, maltose, maple syrup, molasses, panocha, rice syrup, sucrose.

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